Discussion:
Do you remember The Alamo?
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!Jones
2017-02-28 03:53:42 UTC
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My memories of the time have faded after well over four decades have
intervened. In 1973, I was attending San Antonio College and driving a
night-shift taxicab. The big story at the time, of course, was
Watergate; Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein were our heroes; therefore,
I was studying journalism and contributing to the college newspaper,
The Ranger, as well as The Eagle-Bone Whistle (San Antonio's
alternative newspaper in the '60s and '70s). I recall that we were
discussing the idea of "vetting" a story in journalism class; the
professor broke us into groups, assigned each of the groups a lead and
told us to check out our respective leads; of course, these "leads"
were entirely mythical. The one I received was that our new governor,
Dolph Briscoe, had proposed (or would propose) that the state sell the
Alamo and San Jacinto battlefield as we were in a recession and in
need of cash.

I probably never was cut out to be a journalist because I always had a
creative streak and the bit about Dolph selling the Alamo was just way
too pedestrian for me; I decided to jazz it up a little. At that time,
Medina Field was a major training base for Iraqi pilots; therefore,
San Antonio was positively rife with Persian royalty who paraded
through my taxi cab every night. One night, I picked up a few Iraqi
pilots at the Crockett Hotel headed back to base and, as we passed the
Alamo on Bonham St., one of my passengers asked how much it cost to
stay in *that* hotel? ... and that's the origin of the Persian prince
who was going to buy the Alamo.

Well, I had to vet the story and fully expected to find that Dolph was
*not* going to sell the Alamo. To this end, I contacted the Daughters
of the Texas Revolution... I don't recall offhand to whom I spoke;
however, she positively blew a gasket at the very idea. I think I
contacted a San Antonio association of realtors and the governor's
office, all of whom, very predictably, denied knowing anything about
it. Thus, I had debunked the mythical lead, written it up, and that
should have been the end of it.

Except fate intervened. That evening, a few of us met at the Towne
Pump, a campus watering hole on N. St Mary's at Locust St. near SAC...
and the editor of The Ranger was there. I remember that he liked my
piece; I don't recall actually giving him a copy; however, the college
paper ended up publishing it. I didn't think much about it at that
time; my whole thesis was that Texas was absolutely not even going to
consider selling the Alamo and that part of it was true and well
vetted. Someone from The Ranger apparently followed up to Dolph
Briscoe's office, though, because, the governor's office issued a
press release saying essentially what I said in the previous sentence.

But it was a press release! Anyway, this gained the attention of, at
least, the San Antonio news media; we had the San Antonio Express News
and the San Antonio Light at the time; I think that they were both
upset that the San Antonio College paper had scooped them on the story
that (STOP THE PRESS!) the Alamo wasn't for sale. The News added the
part about it being a Saudi Arabian prince (I had said simply
"Persian") who was buying it for his wife. The Light, not to be
outdone, added the part about how he was going to have it disassembled
and shipped home as a wedding gift. Anyway, neither of them attributed
any part of it to The Ranger!

Then the wire services picked up the story. My journalism professor
was out of town; however, he heard the story all the way out in
Seattle and recognized it. I will never forget the phone conversation:

"Jones, what the fuck is going on?"

"Well, sir... " I replied, "You asked for a story, so I gave you one."

"I hope you have a good one for the dean! < CLICK >"

And thus ended my short career as a journalist. It turned out to be a
good thing that I wasn't cited by the other papers because heads
definitely rolled down the aisles of their editorial rooms when the
story's legs crumpled beneath it a short time later. Looking back, I
fault the governor's staff in their formal press release wherein they
changed my initial subjunctive question: "If [somebody] were to
offer..." into the more demonstrative: "*The* prince that *did*
offer..." thereby setting it all in motion. The San Antonio realtors
didn't help when they said that they could not discuss their client's
intentions due to confidentiality (remember that Watergate was in full
bloom!) And, of course, the Daughters of the Texas Revolution added
their contribution by shrieking loudly.

As Jay Gould said: "Nothing is lost, save honor," to which my dean
added: "... and the journalistic integrity of the Texas print media!"
The whole idea, for me, anyway, was to debunk the entire story.

Oh well, thus ends my story about the Alamo.

Jones
de chucka
2017-02-28 05:27:03 UTC
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not a bad movie
!Jones
2017-02-28 12:41:30 UTC
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x-no-idiots: yes

On Tue, 28 Feb 2017 16:27:03 +1100, in alt.war.vietnam de chucka
Post by de chucka
not a bad movie
Really?

While I tend not to accept the claims of "fake news", I am very
sensitive to revisionist history and the skirmish known as "The Texas
Revolution" is nothing if not fraught with revisionism... the greatest
of these is that it was fought by brave Texans longing for freedom.

The Texas Revolution was the first of a series of bloody clashes some
historians (at least one, anyway) have called the "U.S. Slave Wars".
The Mexican taxes were lower than they would have been in the U.S. and
Mexico largely left the colonials alone... but slavery was simply
unconstitutional. Thus, we fought a war (the first of several) over
the idea. Mexico should have won easily; however, their general was
incompetent. (Yeah, it's simplistic; however, reasonably factual.)

Another myth is that the fight at Misión San Antonio de Valero ("the
Alamo") actually accomplished anything. Because the position was
obviously undefendable, i.e.: vulnerable to siege, the commanders were
explicitly ordered to spike the guns, blow the powder, and run east;
however, instead they fiddle-farted around with pickets out on the
road to the south and were caught flat-footed when Santa Ana's cavalry
suddenly rode in on them from due west. Since Santa Ana did *not*
take prisoners, they may as well die heroically, I suppose.

Jones
Chinook Lover
2017-02-28 15:18:40 UTC
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Post by !Jones
x-no-idiots: yes
On Tue, 28 Feb 2017 16:27:03 +1100, in alt.war.vietnam de chucka
Post by de chucka
not a bad movie
Really?
While I tend not to accept the claims of "fake news", I am very
sensitive to revisionist history and the skirmish known as "The Texas
Revolution" is nothing if not fraught with revisionism... the greatest
of these is that it was fought by brave Texans longing for freedom.
The Texas Revolution was the first of a series of bloody clashes some
historians (at least one, anyway) have called the "U.S. Slave Wars".
The Mexican taxes were lower than they would have been in the U.S. and
Mexico largely left the colonials alone... but slavery was simply
unconstitutional. Thus, we fought a war (the first of several) over
the idea. Mexico should have won easily; however, their general was
incompetent. (Yeah, it's simplistic; however, reasonably factual.)
Another myth is that the fight at Misión San Antonio de Valero ("the
Alamo") actually accomplished anything. Because the position was
obviously undefendable, i.e.: vulnerable to siege, the commanders were
explicitly ordered to spike the guns, blow the powder, and run east;
however, instead they fiddle-farted around with pickets out on the
road to the south and were caught flat-footed when Santa Ana's cavalry
suddenly rode in on them from due west. Since Santa Ana did *not*
take prisoners, they may as well die heroically, I suppose.
Jones
sounds better to shoot em swinging and THEN burn the bodies
--
"they called him 'stumpy' and his kidneys were end-stage as well."
!Jones
2017-02-28 15:40:00 UTC
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On Tue, 28 Feb 2017 09:18:40 -0600, in alt.war.vietnam Chinook Lover
Post by Chinook Lover
sounds better to shoot em swinging and THEN burn the bodies
There exists fairly good evidence that a few of the defenders actually
managed to escape during the final assault. One account (Pena)
records that some of the defenders surrendered; however, that wouldn't
make much sense to me. I think I'd go to the bitter end because it
would all end up in a mass grave either way... unless I just got real
lucky and found a way out.

As brutal as the Mexican forces were, they did not kill women and
children and thay did not kill slaves.

Jones
Chinook Lover
2017-02-28 16:45:39 UTC
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Post by !Jones
x-no-idiots: yes
On Tue, 28 Feb 2017 09:18:40 -0600, in alt.war.vietnam Chinook Lover
Post by Chinook Lover
sounds better to shoot em swinging and THEN burn the bodies
There exists fairly good evidence that a few of the defenders actually
managed to escape during the final assault. One account (Pena)
records that some of the defenders surrendered; however, that wouldn't
make much sense to me. I think I'd go to the bitter end because it
would all end up in a mass grave either way... unless I just got real
lucky and found a way out.
As brutal as the Mexican forces were, they did not kill women and
children and thay did not kill slaves.
Jones
it wouldn't look good doing the slaves since the slave issue was behind
som3 of the problems that got everyone's panties in a wad to begin with.
--
"they called him 'stumpy' and his kidneys were end-stage as well."
needtruth
2017-02-28 21:16:39 UTC
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Post by Chinook Lover
Post by !Jones
x-no-idiots: yes
On Tue, 28 Feb 2017 16:27:03 +1100, in alt.war.vietnam de chucka
Post by de chucka
not a bad movie
Really?
While I tend not to accept the claims of "fake news", I am very
sensitive to revisionist history and the skirmish known as "The Texas
Revolution" is nothing if not fraught with revisionism... the greatest
of these is that it was fought by brave Texans longing for freedom.
The Texas Revolution was the first of a series of bloody clashes some
historians (at least one, anyway) have called the "U.S. Slave Wars".
The Mexican taxes were lower than they would have been in the U.S. and
Mexico largely left the colonials alone... but slavery was simply
unconstitutional. Thus, we fought a war (the first of several) over
the idea. Mexico should have won easily; however, their general was
incompetent. (Yeah, it's simplistic; however, reasonably factual.)
Another myth is that the fight at Misión San Antonio de Valero ("the
Alamo") actually accomplished anything. Because the position was
obviously undefendable, i.e.: vulnerable to siege, the commanders were
explicitly ordered to spike the guns, blow the powder, and run east;
however, instead they fiddle-farted around with pickets out on the
road to the south and were caught flat-footed when Santa Ana's cavalry
suddenly rode in on them from due west. Since Santa Ana did *not*
take prisoners, they may as well die heroically, I suppose.
Jones
sounds better to shoot em swinging and THEN burn the bodies
I actually don't much care for The Alamo. In Florida the jerk at the
airport said that the scratch on the right rear fender of the was my
fault when we tried to turn the car in and that I was going to have to
pay for the repair. Before we left the airport, when we picked up the
car, my wife had taken a picture of the fender with her cell phone and
when the guy started babbling on about fault she whipped out her phone,
showed the guy the photo with the date and time stamped on the picture,
pushed the little button on her phone and sent the picture to the great
big server in the sky. She then snarled at the guy "why don't you sue
us, jerk?". He shut up and we never heard from him again. I've never
rented from The Alamo again and don't intend to.

So I do remember The Alamo. Yep, I do.
--
-- --- truthneeded
de chucka
2017-02-28 19:45:53 UTC
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Post by !Jones
x-no-idiots: yes
On Tue, 28 Feb 2017 16:27:03 +1100, in alt.war.vietnam de chucka
Post by de chucka
not a bad movie
Really?
yep
felix
2017-02-28 21:37:30 UTC
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Post by de chucka
not a bad movie
which one, 1960 or 2004?
--
http://thereligionofpeace.com
http://www.barenakedislam.com/
http://www.siotw.org
de chucka
2017-02-28 21:44:54 UTC
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Post by felix
Post by de chucka
not a bad movie
which one, 1960 or 2004?
1960's one with John Wayne, I remember it from wet Sunday afternoon TV
viewing as a kid in the 70's. Dad used to make popcorn and they were fun
times, looking back it was to shut us up and not allow us to run feral
in the house.

and to admit my ignorance I didn't know there was a 2004 version :-(
!Jones
2017-02-28 22:47:38 UTC
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On Wed, 1 Mar 2017 08:44:54 +1100, in alt.war.vietnam de chucka
Post by de chucka
1960's one with John Wayne, I remember it from wet Sunday afternoon TV
viewing as a kid in the 70's. Dad used to make popcorn and they were fun
times, looking back it was to shut us up and not allow us to run feral
in the house.
and to admit my ignorance I didn't know there was a 2004 version :-(
I haven't see the later one and probably won't; I'm usually
disappointed by the remakes, anyway. Besides the special effects, I
don't see how it would improve much... we all know the outcome.

Jones
Chinook Lover
2017-02-28 23:24:07 UTC
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Post by !Jones
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On Wed, 1 Mar 2017 08:44:54 +1100, in alt.war.vietnam de chucka
Post by de chucka
1960's one with John Wayne, I remember it from wet Sunday afternoon TV
viewing as a kid in the 70's. Dad used to make popcorn and they were fun
times, looking back it was to shut us up and not allow us to run feral
in the house.
and to admit my ignorance I didn't know there was a 2004 version :-(
I haven't see the later one and probably won't; I'm usually
disappointed by the remakes, anyway. Besides the special effects, I
don't see how it would improve much... we all know the outcome.
Jones
ah figure it brought us the Riverwalk...aka 'sidewalks by the sewer'
--
"they called him 'stumpy' and his kidneys were end-stage as well."
!Jones
2017-02-28 23:35:33 UTC
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On Tue, 28 Feb 2017 17:24:07 -0600, in alt.war.vietnam Chinook Lover
Post by Chinook Lover
ah figure it brought us the Riverwalk...aka 'sidewalks by the sewer'
Oh, be nice, you asshole! As urban waterways go, it's... sort of...
clean. The San Antonio River blocked the attack from the west and a
little resaca (or "ox-bow lake") looped around to the south;
therefore, Santa Ana's people had to concentrate on the other two
sides (north and east).

Anybody who did (or may have managed to) escape did so to the south
across the swamp.

Jones
Ned Latham
2017-02-28 08:52:20 UTC
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The !Jones nói dói wrote:

----snip----
Post by !Jones
Oh well, thus ends my story about the Alamo.
How very uninteresting.
Chinook Lover
2017-02-28 15:15:31 UTC
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Post by !Jones
My memories of the time have faded after well over four decades have
intervened. In 1973, I was attending San Antonio College and driving a
night-shift taxicab. The big story at the time, of course, was
Watergate; Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein were our heroes; therefore,
I was studying journalism and contributing to the college newspaper,
The Ranger, as well as The Eagle-Bone Whistle (San Antonio's
alternative newspaper in the '60s and '70s). I recall that we were
discussing the idea of "vetting" a story in journalism class; the
professor broke us into groups, assigned each of the groups a lead and
told us to check out our respective leads; of course, these "leads"
were entirely mythical. The one I received was that our new governor,
Dolph Briscoe, had proposed (or would propose) that the state sell the
Alamo and San Jacinto battlefield as we were in a recession and in
need of cash.
I probably never was cut out to be a journalist because I always had a
creative streak and the bit about Dolph selling the Alamo was just way
too pedestrian for me; I decided to jazz it up a little. At that time,
Medina Field was a major training base for Iraqi pilots; therefore,
San Antonio was positively rife with Persian royalty who paraded
through my taxi cab every night. One night, I picked up a few Iraqi
pilots at the Crockett Hotel headed back to base and, as we passed the
Alamo on Bonham St., one of my passengers asked how much it cost to
stay in *that* hotel? ... and that's the origin of the Persian prince
who was going to buy the Alamo.
Well, I had to vet the story and fully expected to find that Dolph was
*not* going to sell the Alamo. To this end, I contacted the Daughters
of the Texas Revolution... I don't recall offhand to whom I spoke;
however, she positively blew a gasket at the very idea. I think I
contacted a San Antonio association of realtors and the governor's
office, all of whom, very predictably, denied knowing anything about
it. Thus, I had debunked the mythical lead, written it up, and that
should have been the end of it.
Except fate intervened. That evening, a few of us met at the Towne
Pump, a campus watering hole on N. St Mary's at Locust St. near SAC...
and the editor of The Ranger was there. I remember that he liked my
piece; I don't recall actually giving him a copy; however, the college
paper ended up publishing it. I didn't think much about it at that
time; my whole thesis was that Texas was absolutely not even going to
consider selling the Alamo and that part of it was true and well
vetted. Someone from The Ranger apparently followed up to Dolph
Briscoe's office, though, because, the governor's office issued a
press release saying essentially what I said in the previous sentence.
But it was a press release! Anyway, this gained the attention of, at
least, the San Antonio news media; we had the San Antonio Express News
and the San Antonio Light at the time; I think that they were both
upset that the San Antonio College paper had scooped them on the story
that (STOP THE PRESS!) the Alamo wasn't for sale. The News added the
part about it being a Saudi Arabian prince (I had said simply
"Persian") who was buying it for his wife. The Light, not to be
outdone, added the part about how he was going to have it disassembled
and shipped home as a wedding gift. Anyway, neither of them attributed
any part of it to The Ranger!
Then the wire services picked up the story. My journalism professor
was out of town; however, he heard the story all the way out in
"Jones, what the fuck is going on?"
"Well, sir... " I replied, "You asked for a story, so I gave you one."
"I hope you have a good one for the dean! < CLICK >"
And thus ended my short career as a journalist. It turned out to be a
good thing that I wasn't cited by the other papers because heads
definitely rolled down the aisles of their editorial rooms when the
story's legs crumpled beneath it a short time later. Looking back, I
fault the governor's staff in their formal press release wherein they
changed my initial subjunctive question: "If [somebody] were to
offer..." into the more demonstrative: "*The* prince that *did*
offer..." thereby setting it all in motion. The San Antonio realtors
didn't help when they said that they could not discuss their client's
intentions due to confidentiality (remember that Watergate was in full
bloom!) And, of course, the Daughters of the Texas Revolution added
their contribution by shrieking loudly.
As Jay Gould said: "Nothing is lost, save honor," to which my dean
added: "... and the journalistic integrity of the Texas print media!"
The whole idea, for me, anyway, was to debunk the entire story.
Oh well, thus ends my story about the Alamo.
Jones
as Reza Pavlavi said, "Iraqi scumbags are not Persians...Irani people
are Persians, Jones, you rotorhead wop!!!!"
--
"they called him 'stumpy' and his kidneys were end-stage as well."
Colonel Edmund J. Burke
2017-03-01 11:37:41 UTC
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Way too long!
Just Wondering
2017-03-02 03:59:14 UTC
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Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
Way too long!
Sandman is the only one hanging out here who's old enough
to remember the Alamo.
felix
2017-03-02 09:30:29 UTC
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Post by Just Wondering
Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
Way too long!
Sandman is the only one hanging out here who's old enough
to remember the Alamo.
the movie or the battle? :)
--
http://thereligionofpeace.com
http://www.barenakedislam.com/
http://www.siotw.org
RD Sandman
2017-03-02 17:17:24 UTC
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Post by Just Wondering
Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
Way too long!
Sandman is the only one hanging out here who's old enough
to remember the Alamo.
I think it is in Texas, isn't it....or was it Arkansas....hmmm,
Georgia...that place is often on my mind. Or was it a she named
Georgia....memory slips...
--
RD Sandman

Airspeed, altitude and brains....two of the three are always
required to complete a mission.

---
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meport
2017-03-02 23:16:26 UTC
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Post by RD Sandman
Post by Just Wondering
Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
Way too long!
Sandman is the only one hanging out here who's old enough
to remember the Alamo.
I think it is in Texas, isn't it....or was it Arkansas....hmmm,
Georgia...that place is often on my mind. Or was it a she named
Georgia....memory slips...
The Alamo is in Agoura Hills, California. It has a good menu. Serves
Mexican food that is very good.
--
--
---
meport
de chucka
2017-03-02 23:40:26 UTC
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Post by meport
Post by RD Sandman
Post by Just Wondering
Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
Way too long!
Sandman is the only one hanging out here who's old enough
to remember the Alamo.
I think it is in Texas, isn't it....or was it Arkansas....hmmm,
Georgia...that place is often on my mind. Or was it a she named
Georgia....memory slips...
The Alamo is in Agoura Hills, California. It has a good menu. Serves
Mexican food that is very good.
Proper Mexican or that Tex/Mex crap?
Chinook Lover
2017-03-03 00:24:13 UTC
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Post by de chucka
Post by meport
Post by RD Sandman
Post by Just Wondering
Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
Way too long!
Sandman is the only one hanging out here who's old enough
to remember the Alamo.
I think it is in Texas, isn't it....or was it Arkansas....hmmm,
Georgia...that place is often on my mind. Or was it a she named
Georgia....memory slips...
The Alamo is in Agoura Hills, California. It has a good menu. Serves
Mexican food that is very good.
Proper Mexican or that Tex/Mex crap?
cal/mex close enough with being snooty
--
"they called him 'stumpy' and his kidneys were end-stage as well."
de chucka
2017-03-03 00:32:52 UTC
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snip
Post by Chinook Lover
Post by de chucka
Post by meport
The Alamo is in Agoura Hills, California. It has a good menu. Serves
Mexican food that is very good.
Proper Mexican or that Tex/Mex crap?
cal/mex close enough with being snooty
Looks like it's closed
RD Sandman
2017-03-03 16:37:50 UTC
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Post by de chucka
Post by meport
Post by RD Sandman
Post by Just Wondering
Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
Way too long!
Sandman is the only one hanging out here who's old enough
to remember the Alamo.
I think it is in Texas, isn't it....or was it Arkansas....hmmm,
Georgia...that place is often on my mind. Or was it a she named
Georgia....memory slips...
The Alamo is in Agoura Hills, California. It has a good menu. Serves
Mexican food that is very good.
Proper Mexican or that Tex/Mex crap?
Both are good depending on who is making it.
--
RD Sandman

Airspeed, altitude and brains....two of the three are always
required to complete a mission.

---
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r***@gmail.com
2017-03-03 02:15:35 UTC
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Post by meport
Post by RD Sandman
Post by Just Wondering
Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
Way too long!
Sandman is the only one hanging out here who's old enough
to remember the Alamo.
I think it is in Texas, isn't it....or was it Arkansas....hmmm,
Georgia...that place is often on my mind. Or was it a she named
Georgia....memory slips...
The Alamo is in Agoura Hills, California. It has a good menu. Serves
Mexican food that is very good.
--
This what I remember of the alamo...

redvet
http://www.vvawai.org/

***************************************************************




By Miguel Alfonso Cañero from the L.A. Writers Collective


Springtime blooms with life. Each flower brings a new image full of
hope and promise.
There’s one image that fills my heart with great joy and a lot of
pride. It’s an image that raises our sights to a better and radically
different future for humanity. It’s an image that points to the
possibility of lifting the weight of thousands of years of oppression
and exploitation off our backs.
It’s an image of revolutionary courage and love for the people. It’s
an image of Comrade Damián García scaling the walls of the Alamo--a
hated symbol of the bloody conquest and plunder--and standing,
defiant, with a brilliant red flag flying against the backdrop of the
San Antonio sky.
On that day, March 20, 1980, Damián García and two other
revolutionaries climbed to the top of the Alamo, threw down the Texas
flag, and raised in its place the red flag of the international
proletariat. Damián told the entire world: “We've come to set the
record straight about the Alamo. This is a symbol of the theft of
Mexican land, a symbol about the murder of Mexicans and Indians, and a
symbol of oppression of Chicanos and Mexicanos throughout the whole
Southwest." And he called on people, together with the proletariat
worldwide, to come out in struggle on May First, International Workers
Day.
In 1836 the Alamo, a Mexican garrison in San Antonio, was seized by
Anglo slave owners and traders and mercenaries who had settled
illegally in Texas and were waging a war to secede from Mexico (where
slavery had been abolished). They were soon defeated by the Mexican
Army who took back the Alamo, killing all 182 Texan defenders. A few
weeks later, the Anglo forces took the Mexican army by surprise in a
battle where they shouted “Remember the Alamo” to justify their
massacre. Every since then, a myth has been promoted about the
“heroes” of the Alamo, and “Remember the Alamo” has been a call for
vicious vengeance against the enemies of the U.S. But the reality is
that the “heroes” of the Alamo--like Davy Crockett, Jim Bowie and
William B. Travis--were land speculators, mercenaries, and slave
traders and smugglers.
Later, through an unprovoked war of aggression, the U.S. stole half of
Mexico (now the U.S. Southwest). The U.S. signed a treaty that
promised rights to Mexican people who remained in these territories,
but this treaty was never intended to be followed. The result has been
a long history of brutal subjugation and oppression of Mexicanos,
Chicanos, and other people--and a border that expresses the U.S.
domination of Mexico.
Damián’s life concentrated this experience for Chicanos and Mexicanos
living in the Southwest. He grew up in the projects of San Bernardino,
California, and watched his Mexican father get denied job after job
because of the color of his skin. Damián grew up being looked down
upon and humiliated. Like many youth, Damián was always trying to find
a way out.
Damián graduated from UC Santa Barbara. In the mid-‘70s he was the
executive director of La Casa de la Raza--but Damián wanted more. He
hooked up with the Revolutionary Communist Party, and he dedicated his
life--not just to the liberation of his raza--but to the liberation of
all of humanity. He came to see that he was part of an international
class of people--of different nationalities, cultures and
languages--whose labor produces tremendous wealth that gets stolen by
a small class of capitalist-imperialists.
Damián had come to see that humanity, with all its knowledge and
technology, had reached a point in its development where things did
not have to be this way. He had come to take up communist revolution
as the solution to the tremendous inequalities and lopsidedness that
exists.
And he had become part of building for May Day actions in 1980 to
raise the red flag and declare that our struggle is an international
struggle and we are part of the world revolution. He saw that a whole
different world was possible--a communist world.
With the bold action atop the Alamo, Damián gave voice to the millions
here in the U.S. and billions around the world for whom reality is
hell on earth under this capitalist nightmare. The ruling class was
deeply stung by the raising of the red flag and the inspiring
internationalist stance taken on top of that decrepit symbol of
oppression. And they lashed back with a vengeance typical of their
Alamo myth. On April 22, 1980, while building for May Day and doing
revolutionary work among the masses in a Los Angeles housing project,
Damián was assassinated by police agents.
His death was a tremendous loss felt by many in society. A Black
prisoner in an Atlanta city jail dedicated a poem that began: “Damián
García is Dead. But in His Death I Came Alive.”
Twenty-six springs have passed since that red San Antonio day.
I’m restless that by the end of today, forty thousand children will
die from starvation and preventable and curable disease in the Third
World.
I’m restless after hearing Bob Avakian on the “Ghetto Remix” song
speak of all the beautiful children in this society who are full of
life and so much promise when they’re young, but get robbed of it by
what this system does to them as they grow a little older.
I can imagine how Damián García felt, also restless.
There are millions today agonizing over the direction that this
society and the whole world is headed in. Right now, a challenge is
posed for all those who hunger for an end to this horrific epoch. This
is a challenge that thousands and ultimately millions, including the
new generation, must take up--the challenge to come forward and be
emancipators of humanity. The challenge to get down with and apply the
communist world outlook, method and approach and fight to radically
transform the world. A challenge to light up the sky with the red
flag--to live like Damián García.
!Jones
2017-03-03 12:23:26 UTC
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On Thu, 02 Mar 2017 16:15:35 -1000, in alt.war.vietnam
Post by r***@gmail.com
In 1836 the Alamo, a Mexican garrison in San Antonio, was seized by
Anglo slave owners and traders and mercenaries who had settled
illegally in Texas and were waging a war to secede from Mexico.
There wasn't a "Mexican garrison" anyplace in Texas except near what
is now Corpus Christi on the coast and the residents of Texas had
settled legally and become Mexican citizens; however, at the time, the
issue of slavery was just beginning to come to the front burner of
history. Prior to 1821, Mexico had institutional slavery; therefore,
the Texans looked at it as a taking of their personal property.

The Texas Revolution was one of several "slave wars" involving the
United States; the War of 1812 also centered on slavery because the
Brits were interdicting the Dutch slave trade.

Jones
!Jones
2017-03-03 12:09:24 UTC
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On Thu, 2 Mar 2017 18:16:26 -0500, in alt.war.vietnam meport
Post by meport
The Alamo is in Agoura Hills, California. It has a good menu. Serves
Mexican food that is very good.
"Alamosa" (or just "alamo") is the Spanish term for a cottonwood tree.
*The* Alamo, the state shrine of Texas, was so called because it was
originally built amidst such trees. Its given name was "Misión de
Bexar de Valero", where Bexar was the original name of the settlement
and Valero was probably the founding order of Jesuit monks.

In the first movie, there's a scene where Davy Crockett (John Wayne)
stops on a ridge, points to the Alamo, and says: "There is is, men,
Bexar de Valero." (Pronounced: "BE har" with a short 'e')

Around 1800 or so, the town picked up the name of the local river and
the mission became: "Misión San Antonio de Valero".

Jones
Chinook Lover
2017-03-03 13:32:36 UTC
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On Thu, 2 Mar 2017 18:16:26 -0500, in alt.war.vietnam meport
Post by meport
The Alamo is in Agoura Hills, California. It has a good menu. Serves
Mexican food that is very good.
"Alamosa" (or just "alamo") is the Spanish term for a cottonwood tree.
*The* Alamo, the state shrine of Texas, was so called because it was
originally built amidst such trees. Its given name was "Misión de
Bexar de Valero", where Bexar was the original name of the settlement
and Valero was probably the founding order of Jesuit monks.
In the first movie, there's a scene where Davy Crockett (John Wayne)
stops on a ridge, points to the Alamo, and says: "There is is, men,
Bexar de Valero." (Pronounced: "BE har" with a short 'e')
Around 1800 or so, the town picked up the name of the local river and
the mission became: "Misión San Antonio de Valero".
Jones
so why not call it 'mision rio verde de valero'
--
"they called him 'stumpy' and his kidneys were end-stage as well."
!Jones
2017-03-04 12:20:31 UTC
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On Fri, 3 Mar 2017 07:32:36 -0600, in alt.war.vietnam Chinook Lover
Post by Chinook Lover
so why not call it 'mision rio verde de valero'
Because it wasn't green!
Chinook Lover
2017-03-04 14:51:21 UTC
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On Fri, 3 Mar 2017 07:32:36 -0600, in alt.war.vietnam Chinook Lover
Post by Chinook Lover
so why not call it 'mision rio verde de valero'
Because it wasn't green!
I thought it was verde til they cleaned it up...granted the Trinity
might look good in green. the smell tho would be the challenge.
--
"they called him 'stumpy' and his kidneys were end-stage as well."
!Jones
2017-03-04 16:10:13 UTC
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On Sat, 4 Mar 2017 08:51:21 -0600, in alt.war.vietnam Chinook Lover
Post by Chinook Lover
I thought it was verde til they cleaned it up...granted the Trinity
might look good in green. the smell tho would be the challenge.
The San Antonio River is pretty closely monitored. I once knew some
people who had a metal finishing business on the north side of town
above the river. Disposing of the chemicals was probably their
greatest expense, so they just dumped a few hundred gallons in the
creek behind their shop one day. They had EPA people crawling all
over their asses within a few hours... I mean, they were *right* there
as soon as the first trace of it hit the river.

And, aye, gwad, did they ever stick it in 'em and break it off! By
the time they paid the fines and the clean-up bill, they were probably
peeing in the river because they lacked a pot.

And that was 30-something years ago.

Jones
RD Sandman
2017-03-03 16:37:17 UTC
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Post by meport
Post by RD Sandman
Post by Just Wondering
Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
Way too long!
Sandman is the only one hanging out here who's old enough
to remember the Alamo.
I think it is in Texas, isn't it....or was it Arkansas....hmmm,
Georgia...that place is often on my mind. Or was it a she named
Georgia....memory slips...
The Alamo is in Agoura Hills, California. It has a good menu. Serves
Mexican food that is very good.
I may have eaten there one time a long time ago. I have a lot of family in
the LA/Santa Monica area.
--
RD Sandman

Airspeed, altitude and brains....two of the three are always
required to complete a mission.

---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus
!Jones
2017-03-04 12:23:39 UTC
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On Fri, 03 Mar 2017 10:37:17 -0600, in alt.war.vietnam RD Sandman
Post by RD Sandman
I may have eaten there one time a long time ago. I have a lot of family in
the LA/Santa Monica area.
I had one of my milestone birthdays (60, I think) in Dublin, Ireland
and we ate at "the Alamo" in the entertainment district. There was a
mural depecting the fight replete with native Americans in war paint
among the attackers.

Jones
de chucka
2017-03-05 21:35:59 UTC
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On Fri, 03 Mar 2017 10:37:17 -0600, in alt.war.vietnam RD Sandman
Post by RD Sandman
I may have eaten there one time a long time ago. I have a lot of family in
the LA/Santa Monica area.
I had one of my milestone birthdays (60, I think) in Dublin, Ireland
and we ate at "the Alamo" in the entertainment district. There was a
mural depecting the fight replete with native Americans in war paint
among the attackers.
You go all the way to Dublin and eat Mexican food, typical septic
!Jones
2017-03-06 03:59:47 UTC
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On Mon, 6 Mar 2017 08:35:59 +1100, in alt.war.vietnam de chucka
Post by de chucka
Post by !Jones
x-no-idiots: yes
On Fri, 03 Mar 2017 10:37:17 -0600, in alt.war.vietnam RD Sandman
Post by RD Sandman
I may have eaten there one time a long time ago. I have a lot of family in
the LA/Santa Monica area.
I had one of my milestone birthdays (60, I think) in Dublin, Ireland
and we ate at "the Alamo" in the entertainment district. There was a
mural depecting the fight replete with native Americans in war paint
among the attackers.
You go all the way to Dublin and eat Mexican food, typical septic
It was a burger joint; I wasn't impressed with Irish cuisine.

Jones
de chucka
2017-03-06 04:17:28 UTC
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On Mon, 6 Mar 2017 08:35:59 +1100, in alt.war.vietnam de chucka
Post by de chucka
Post by !Jones
x-no-idiots: yes
On Fri, 03 Mar 2017 10:37:17 -0600, in alt.war.vietnam RD Sandman
Post by RD Sandman
I may have eaten there one time a long time ago. I have a lot of family in
the LA/Santa Monica area.
I had one of my milestone birthdays (60, I think) in Dublin, Ireland
and we ate at "the Alamo" in the entertainment district. There was a
mural depecting the fight replete with native Americans in war paint
among the attackers.
You go all the way to Dublin and eat Mexican food, typical septic
It was a burger joint;
Say no more, did you have freedom fries and ketchup with it.

I had the best 7 course meal I've ever had when I was in in Ireland, 6
pints of Guinness and a potato
Ned Latham
2017-03-06 10:32:00 UTC
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de chucka wrote:

----snip----
Post by de chucka
I had the best 7 course meal I've ever had when I was in in Ireland,
6 pints of Guinness and a potato
LOL
!Jones
2017-03-06 12:44:20 UTC
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On Mon, 6 Mar 2017 15:17:28 +1100, in alt.war.vietnam de chucka
Post by de chucka
Say no more, did you have freedom fries and ketchup with it.
I had the best 7 course meal I've ever had when I was in in Ireland, 6
pints of Guinness and a potato
Don't get me wrong, I love Ireland. The beer is good and the wine
also... 'cept I don't drink anymore. OK, the cheese is very high
quality... and you can get most anything at the store. The
traditional Irish dishes, though, are just downright disgusting.

Jones
Chinook Lover
2017-03-06 13:33:04 UTC
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On Mon, 6 Mar 2017 15:17:28 +1100, in alt.war.vietnam de chucka
Post by de chucka
Say no more, did you have freedom fries and ketchup with it.
I had the best 7 course meal I've ever had when I was in in Ireland, 6
pints of Guinness and a potato
Don't get me wrong, I love Ireland. The beer is good and the wine
also... 'cept I don't drink anymore. OK, the cheese is very high
quality... and you can get most anything at the store. The
traditional Irish dishes, though, are just downright disgusting.
Jones
kinda meat and potatoes period. they do have some bizarre 'local'
dishes though...don't know if any of it is like the Scot's 'menudo' I
guess when that's all ya got
--
"they called him 'stumpy' and his kidneys were end-stage as well."
!Jones
2017-03-06 14:23:23 UTC
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On Mon, 6 Mar 2017 07:33:04 -0600, in alt.war.vietnam Chinook Lover
Post by Chinook Lover
kinda meat and potatoes period. they do have some bizarre 'local'
dishes though...don't know if any of it is like the Scot's 'menudo' I
guess when that's all ya got
Their "traditional Irish breakfast" is simply not composed of edible
substances.

Jones
dino
2017-03-06 15:57:30 UTC
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Post by Chinook Lover
Post by !Jones
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On Mon, 6 Mar 2017 15:17:28 +1100, in alt.war.vietnam de chucka
Post by de chucka
Say no more, did you have freedom fries and ketchup with it.
I had the best 7 course meal I've ever had when I was in in Ireland, 6
pints of Guinness and a potato
Don't get me wrong, I love Ireland. The beer is good and the wine
also... 'cept I don't drink anymore. OK, the cheese is very high
quality... and you can get most anything at the store. The
traditional Irish dishes, though, are just downright disgusting.
Jones
kinda meat and potatoes period. they do have some bizarre 'local'
dishes though...don't know if any of it is like the Scot's 'menudo' I
guess when that's all ya got
Not sure of the food but this Irish bloke is one of the funniest I've ever seen:

MarcusAurelius
2017-03-06 18:40:32 UTC
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My mother was a member of the DRT, the Daughters of the Republic of Texas, as a descendant of those who fought for the patriots in the Texas War of Independence against Mexico!
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